0%

Review

In Star Wars Jedi: Fallen you start as Cal Kostis on the planet Bracca. As a result of Order 66, he has gone into hiding as a young Padawan and now ekes out an existence as a scrap collector. But of course, it comes as it must: There is an incident and the Padawan uses his hidden powers as a Jedi. This does not remain unnoticed and soon the Empire...

STAR WARS Jedi: Fallen Order™

  • Greg Burn
  • Jun 15, 2021

In Star Wars Jedi: Fallen you start as Cal Kostis on the planet Bracca. As a result of Order 66, he has gone into hiding as a young Padawan and now ekes out an existence as a scrap collector. But of course, it comes as it must: There is an incident and the Padawan uses his hidden powers as a Jedi. This does not remain unnoticed and soon the Empire is on the mat. They force Cal into the flight, while the player is confronted with the basic game mechanics. Luckily, the Padawan has picked up his master's lightsaber. Blocking attacks, parrying, reflecting volleys, all no problem for Cal.

Beyond these abilities, the talents you unlock provide new gameplay options. Whether it's the infamous laser sword throw, the power boost, or the ability to slow down enemies. Using a talent tree, you can unlock all these game options, step by step.

To make the exploration in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order easier, your little friend BB-1 is at your disposal. The druid is not only cutely animated and designed, but also turns out to be a real helper. 

Of course, you can also customize BB-1's appearance, like that of Mantis and Cal's clothes. The game has a real abundance of skins hidden away, though these are often limited to color variations. Collectors will have a blast exploring, but the usefulness is limited. Hidden among all these hidden skins, however, are useful enhancements now and then. 

While the music dynamically adapts to the environments and the gameplay, there is a reason for criticism in the technology, despite all the praise. Sometimes the exploration seems a bit annoying due to errors in the collision detection. You miss a wall run because the character doesn't perceive the wall as such in time or jumps past a ledge because Cal doesn't grab it despite pressing the button. Fortunately, falling into an abyss only drains some of your health, but you're sometimes left gasping for breath. Furthermore, fighting multiple enemies can be frustrating, as aiming at the targets turns out to be more cumbersome than necessary. Automatic aiming - which is optional - only solves the problem to a certain extent. 

Conclusion
Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order has managed to do what the last two cinematic parts failed grandly at for me: The game pulled me back into the Star Wars universe. It's a single-player game with few compromises, and it's a labor of love for Star Wars fans. The game isn't outstanding, struggles with weaknesses in controls and technology, plus more stories around some characters and worlds wouldn't have hurt. Developer Respawn Entertainment is uncompromising when it comes to the scope. You get a complete game, with around 20 to 30 hours of playtime, depending on your pace and urge to explore. There are tie-ins with other Star Wars stories, guest appearances by familiar characters, and a great friendship story between Cal Kestis and BB-1. It's also ironic that the little android often comes to life more than the main character himself.

The great settings, the good soundtrack, the sophisticated and well-functioning battle system as well as the possibilities for exploration and a grandiose finale compensate for the small weaknesses and many unnecessary moments of frustration. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order is a great game and the best single-player experience in the saga since the Jedi Knight titles.

50%
50%
50%
50%