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Review

Death Stranding offers a manageable amount of graphics settings on the PC. Nevertheless, gamers can look forward to visibly sharper textures, more details, and especially higher FPS. Not only does the title support 60 FPS, but also frame rates of up to 240 FPS. Those who were hoping for ray tracing will unfortunately be disappointed. Ray tracing...

DEATH STRANDING

  • Greg Burn
  • May 03, 2021

Death Stranding offers a manageable amount of graphics settings on the PC. Nevertheless, gamers can look forward to visibly sharper textures, more details, and especially higher FPS. Not only does the title support 60 FPS, but also frame rates of up to 240 FPS.

Those who were hoping for ray tracing will unfortunately be disappointed. Ray tracing is not supported in Death Stranding, but that is something to get over. The title offers an impressive use of atmospheric effects and light scenes from the ground up. Especially the representation of fog and dynamic clouds draws atmospheric pictures. You will have to do without an improved environment coverage or finer reflections.

Death Stranding lives from the atmosphere it creates in the open world. This also includes the audio experience, which offers a headphone option, but otherwise does not come up with any noteworthy settings. While it is understandable that the developers wanted to create an audiovisual experience, separate controls for voice output, music and effects would have been desirable. At least the game can score with a good audio mix, but that doesn't compensate for the lack of settings options.

Things look better with the control settings. Designed for keyboard and mouse, you can assign a multitude of keys individually. This doesn't make the sometimes cumbersome menu navigation any easier, but it does make it more comfortable with the mouse in some places.

Death Stranding is not only one of the most atmospheric games on the PC, but also one of the most beautiful.

Conclusion:
Hideo Kojima has created a unique world with his mix of science fiction, mystery, and apocalyptic survivalism. Death Stranding trumps with a cinematic story that many a game could take a leaf out of. 

Although it has become standard to stretch games with fetch quests, Death Stranding is completely based on them. The main quests are fetched quests and the side quests are fetched quests.

At least the actual gameplay experience works well. This is not the least because Death Stranding is probably the most advanced walking simulator of our time. But much more interesting is the social aspect of the game. Death Stranding has redefined asynchronous co-op play, and it's to be hoped that other studios will take a leaf out of their book. While some mechanics, such as the influx of resources and the decay of structures could quietly be more comprehensible, that doesn't detract from the experience. The world feels alive, even though you never see another player. And above all, it proves one thing: we can all pull together - if we want to.

Death Stranding is unquestionably unique, both positively and negatively. More social experiment and interactive film, but less game, it places very unique demands on players. It's not a game for everyone, but it's a game that everyone should have played at least once.

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